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Diabetes Developments - A blog on latest developments in diabetes by David Mendosa

Cocoa Can Help Prevent Type 3 Diabetes

May 2nd, 2015 · 14 Comments

When we eat chocolate, those of us who have diabetes may be able to reduce our insulin resistance and prevent the memory loss that leads to Alzheimer’s Disease, which some scholars are beginning to call type 3 diabetes.

cocoa-beans

Cocoa Beans

Chocolate comes from cocoa beans, which for a good reason has the scientific name meaning “food of the gods.” That’s because the Aztecs, who domesticated it, saw it as a sacred plant, and reserved it for their royalty.

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Diabetes Testing Is Useless

April 17th, 2015 · 25 Comments

Unless people with diabetes are taking insulin, they waste their time and money when they test their blood sugar.

meter

I agree with the conclusions of a review from the Cochrane Collaboration, the most respected group that reviews scientific studies. The review concluded that among people who have had type 2 diabetes for more than one year and aren’t using insulin the effect of testing “is small.” And when they have diabetes longer it makes even less difference. Even worse: no evidence shows that testing “affects patient satisfaction, general well-being, or general health-related quality of life.”

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How Awe and Other Positive Emotions Help Us Manage Diabetes Inflammation

April 14th, 2015 · 11 Comments

The Awe Inspiring Site of the Grand Canyon

The Awe Inspiring Site of the Grand Canyon

(My Photograph from the North Rim)

We manage our diabetes better when we feel positive emotions, the most important of which is awe. This is the conclusion of research that the American Psychological Association’s professional journal Emotion will publish.

Jennifer Stellar, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Toronto, is the lead author of a study linking emotions and those proteins in our bodies that regulate inflammation. It connects with earlier studies had linked those proteins with the development of diabetes.

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The Best Trick to Get Enough Sleep for Diabetes Health

April 13th, 2015 · 7 Comments

Did you really believe that you need to get 7 or 8 hours of sleep every night to for your diabetes health? Most sleep researchers will tell you that. I even parroted their views in my previous article,“How Much Sleep Is Right for You?” But they’re wrong.

When we are wise enough, however, we can trick our body into believing that it has enough rest. In fact, a new study proves that this trick works.

The problem is that most of the experts fail to take into account the multiplier effect of an afternoon nap. But now some them have seen the light. The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism a few days ago published their new study online ahead of print.

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How Much Sleep Is Right for You?

April 10th, 2015 · No Comments

People have the smallest risk of getting type 2 diabetes when they get 7 to 8 hours of sleep at night, a new study concludes. Many of us get less than that, and it’s not hard to accept that we need that much. But what’s hard for me to accept is their finding that more than 8 hours of sleep is as bad for us as getting too little sleep.

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This study is a meta-analysis of 10 previous studies that Diabetes Care (a professional journal of the American Diabetes Association) just published in its March 2015 issue. Only the abstract of the study, “Sleep Duration and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes,” is available free online, but my friend and colleague, Dr. Bill Quick, sent me the full-text.

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Too Little Sleep Means Insulin Works Poorly

April 9th, 2015 · 4 Comments

Research published February 19 in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, shows that lack of sleep can elevate levels of free fatty acids in the blood. The full-text of the study, “Sleep restriction increases free fatty acids in healthy men,” is available free online. An earlier study, “Fatty Acids, Obesity, and Insulin Resistance,” connected the dots between fatty acids and diabetes.

They Discover the Cause

This is an important study because it found how and why enough sleep is important for managing our diabetes. When scientists know the mechanism, we can have more confidence in their conclusions.

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The New Breakfast for People with Diabetes

March 26th, 2015 · 25 Comments

The usual food that I eat for breakfast has changed because of my new diet. But it’s better for me than the smoked salmon that I ate before. It also tastes even better.

More than seven years ago when I began to follow a very-low carb diet, people told me that it would be hard to stay on. Shortly after I started on it I wrote “Why I Low-carb” for a diabetes magazine. But for me it was no challenge. I still follow a plan of eating no more than six grams of carbohydrate for breakfast, 12 grams for lunch, and 12 grams for dinner — unless I skip dinner altogether on an “Intermittent Fast.”

But even I believed it would be difficult to combine my very low-carb diet with one that is also vegetarian — for ethical reasons I began to do both last November. I wrote about that experiment here at “Vegetarian and Low-Carb Diets for Diabetes.”

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Diabetes Support Groups Connect Us

March 16th, 2015 · 13 Comments

When we get diabetes we are even more isolated from our culture than most people are. While this makes finding a solution more difficult for us, but we have a way to get out.

People around the world are fast losing their cultural ties, as I wrote in my most recent articles here, “Diabetes Lessons from Indigenous Cultures” and “Separation from Our Culture Leads to Diabetes.”

Most of us are becoming more isolated from our cultural roots. Consequently, we are losing our sense of community: Community and culture go together.

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Separation from Our Culture Leads to Diabetes

March 12th, 2015 · 6 Comments

The diabetes epidemic in the developed  world is a result of separation from our culture. While the evidence is in plain sight, we have largely ignored it.

Those of us in here who have diabetes are as much subject to the breakdown of culture as the indigenous peoples of the world whose cultural ties broke when they came into contact with us. “Diabetes Lessons from Indigenous Cultures” shows three examples of that collective trauma.

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Diabetes Lessons from Indigenous Cultures

March 8th, 2015 · No Comments

One big reason why you and I have type 2 diabetes may be because we have broken ties to our culture. Another way of saying this is that our Western culture is itself broken.

This remains an hypothesis, but it’s one that follows from research into the basic cause of diabetes among First Nations people of Canada, the Aboriginal Australians, and the Pima Indians of Arizona. Studies are finding a link between cultural collapse and diabetes among indigenous peoples around the world.

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