It appears that you are currently using Ad Blocking software. What are the consequences? Click here to learn more.
Advertisement
Shop At The Mendosa Store
Diabetes Developments - A blog on latest developments in diabetes by David Mendosa

Metformin: Best Oral Drug for Type 2 Diabetes

June 15th, 2016 · Comments Off

Metformin is the type of pill that your doctor should prescribe for you when you begin to manage type 2 diabetes. This is the key recommendation of a huge new meta-analysis. Of the six classes of oral drugs that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves when people take only one drug for diabetes, metformin ranks first in overall safety and effectiveness.

“We concluded that metformin looks better for cardiovascular mortality than sulfonylureas,” says lead author Nisa Maruthur, MD, of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. “It has a long-term safety profile. Metformin is weight neutral or helps people lose weight, and its gastrointestinal side effects are avoidable or tolerable. Its effect on A1C is similar to other medications.”

Until now, researchers didn’t have any firm evidence that one class of drugs was best at reducing cardiovascular risk — heart attacks and strokes. If you have uncontrolled blood glucose, this is your the most serious diabetes risk. But the researchers concluded that metformin reduces the relative risk of a patient dying from heart disease by about 30 to 40 percent compared to its closest competitor drug, the sulfonylurea class.

The Annals of Internal Medicine, a peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Physicians, just published the study online ahead of print as “Diabetes Medications as Monotherapy or Metformin-Based Combination Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes.” It is comprehensive meta-analysis of more than 200 studies with more than 1.4 million people with diabetes. Those studies made head-to-head comparisons of the six drug classes: metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, DPP-4 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, and SGLT-2 inhibitors.

[Read more →]

Share

Print This Post Print This Post


Comments OffPosted in: Diabetes Medication

With this Meter You Will Just Press Once

June 14th, 2016 · Comments Off

It may be the biggest step forward in blood glucose meter technology in years. It is the Pogo Automatic Blood Glucose Monitoring System, and the company that makes it is Intuity Medical in Sunnyvale, California.

The company just received clearance from U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market the Pogo meter here. When we will finally be able to get our hands on one, we will have the quickest, simplest, most discreet blood glucose meter ever made. It’s taking a long time, but it will be worth the wait.

In fact, we will still have to wait a few more months to buy one. Robin Gaffney, Intuity Medical’s Head of Marketing, tells me that they plan to launch the Pogo sometime next year. They haven’t finalized pricing nor have I yet been able to get a device for review.

Credit: Intuity Medical

But I still remember how impressed I was when I saw a prototype of the Pogo almost eight years ago at the American Diabetes Association’s annual convention in San Francisco. In fact, as long ago as April 2003, in my “Blood Glucose Meters” directory I listed Intuity Medical by its former name, Rosedale Medical, as working on a blood glucose meter. So I asked Ms. Gaffney why it took Intuity Medical so long to get FDA clearance for its first meter.

[Read more →]

Share

Print This Post Print This Post


Comments OffPosted in: Diabetes Testing

Berberine Is a Diabetes Drug in Disguise

May 27th, 2016 · 2 Comments

Berberine might be the best supplement that you can take to reduce your blood glucose. But first you need to consider the disadvantages of any supplement.

Berberine has apparently been an important herbal remedy in Chinese medicine for hundreds, if not thousands, of years. Now, it is becoming increasingly well known in the West.

Growing interest in berberine

The U.S. National Library of Medicine indexes about 4,000 studies in professional journals that include berberine. This is far more than the 800 on bitter melon and the 200 on gymnema sylvestre, which quite a few people have told me they use to manage their blood glucose. It’s clear that interest in berberine is growing fast: more than 1,500 of the 4,000 studies were published in the last five years.

But people use berberine for many conditions. Just 243 of these studies are about berberine and diabetes, and 79 of them are human studies (the others are studies of berberine in animals or in test tubes).

[Read more →]

Share

Print This Post Print This Post


→ 2 CommentsPosted in: Diabetes Medication

You Can Use Metformin Even with Reduced Kidney Function

May 21st, 2016 · Comments Off

Metformin and 18 brand-name drugs that include it are safe for millions of people with diabetes who have reduced kidney function. This month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a drug safety communication that will let at least 2.5 million more Americans who have this disease use this diabetes drug.

In addition to metformin itself, which is a generic drug, it remains available as Glucophage, the original brand name. Other brands of metformin that the FDA’s decision affects include Actoplus Met, Avandamet, Glucovance, and Janumet.

[Read more →]

Share

Print This Post Print This Post


Comments OffPosted in: Diabetes Medication

How to Manage Your Diabetes with Coffee

May 20th, 2016 · 1 Comment

Coffee can reduce the blood glucose levels of people with type 2 diabetes by improving insulin sensitivity. This is the conclusion of a study just published in the International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

This cross-sectional study compared four groups of people:

  • 48 people who have type 2 diabetes and do drink coffee
  • 42 people who have type 2 diabetes and don’t drink coffee or any caffeinated beverage
  • 143 people who don’t have diabetes and do drink coffee
  • 57 people who don’t have diabetes and don’t drink coffee or any caffeinated beverage

All of the coffee drinkers in the study had drunk 3 to 4 cups of filtered coffee daily for at least 16 years. And all of the people with diabetes in the study took oral diabetes drugs and were free of diabetes complications.

[Read more →]

Share

Print This Post Print This Post


→ 1 CommentPosted in: Diabetes Diet

Eat Saturated Fat to Help Avoid Diabetes

May 17th, 2016 · Comments Off

A new study demonstrates that the fat in dairy foods — which is mostly saturated  – can reduce the risk of diabetes. Its findings challenge the U.S. government’s current “Dietary Guidelines for Americans.”

The American Heart Association published the study online a few days ago before printing it in a forthcoming issue of the association’s peer-reviewed journal Circulation. While only the abstract is free online, a representative of the lead author, Dariush Mozaffarian, M.D., the dean of Tufts University’s School of Nutrition Science, send me the full text, which I carefully studied. The seven other researchers are professors at Harvard and Tufts Universities, including two of the best known and widely published nutritionists in the country, Walter Willett, M.D. and Frank Hu, M.D.

[Read more →]

Share

Print This Post Print This Post


Comments OffPosted in: Diabetes Diet

Check the Consistency of Your Blood Glucose Meter

May 16th, 2016 · 3 Comments

When you get a new blood glucose meter, you need to determine if it is consistent.

Everyone who has diabetes has to rely on this little home medical device. It is a quick and easy way for you to find out if the food you are eating, the activity you are getting, the medicine and supplements that you use, and the amount of stress that you face are making your blood glucose level dangerously high or low.

Like any medical device, your blood glucose meter isn’t perfect. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration sets their standards and approves which blood glucose meters may be sold to the American public. But the FDA doesn’t set the highest possible standards, so the manufacturers of blood glucose meters naturally compete largely on the basis of price.

[Read more →]

Share

Print This Post Print This Post


→ 3 CommentsPosted in: Diabetes Testing

Waist Size Is a Better Predictor of Heart Disease

May 15th, 2016 · 1 Comment

When it comes to either your waist or your body mass index, bigger isn’t better. But the size of your waist predicts whether you will get diabetic heart disease even better than the body mass index (BMI) does.

A collaborative team of nine researchers from the Intermountain Heart Institute in Salt Lake City and Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore reported their findings this month at this year’s scientific sessions of the American College of Cardiology. I obtained a copy of the study and the poster presented at the scientific sessions from a representative of the institute.

[Read more →]

Share

Print This Post Print This Post


→ 1 CommentPosted in: Diabetes Complications

Do Tai Chi for Your Heart

April 29th, 2016 · Comments Off

Credit: Harbor Athletic Club

When you do the ancient Chinese exercise of tai chi, you can minimize your risk of heart problems, the most common and serious complication of diabetes, according to a meta-analysis of 35 randomized clinical trials. Just published in the March 9, 2016, issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association, the study shows that tai chi and other traditional Chinese exercises like qigong can lower the blood pressure, improve the cholesterol and triglyceride levels, boost the quality of life, and reduce the depression of people living with heart disease and stroke.

The improvements in blood pressure and lipid levels were statistically significant. People in the studies reported more satisfaction with their quality of life and lower levels of depression.

[Read more →]

Share

Print This Post Print This Post


Comments OffPosted in: Exercise For Diabetes

Mindfulness Leads to Better Blood Glucose

April 27th, 2016 · Comments Off

Credit: Pixabay

Better blood glucose levels are linked to mindfulness in a new study by Brown University researchers. Because sustained high blood glucose levels lead to the complications of diabetes and prediabetes, nothing could be more important for us.

The study measured several physical and psychological health indicators in 399 volunteers who participate in the New England Family Study. Eric B. Loucks, PhD, and five colleagues published the study, “Associations of Mindfulness with Glucose Regulation and Diabetes,” in the March 2016 issue of the American Journal of Health Behavior. Dr. Loucks is assistant professor of epidemiology at Brown University’s School of Public Health.

Only the abstract of the study is free online, but on my request a representative of Brown University provided me with a copy of the manuscript that Dr. Loucks had written for publication. This let me learn all the details of the study and provided an analysis of how the findings relate to those of us who have to live with diabetes or prediabetes.

[Read more →]

Share

Print This Post Print This Post


Comments OffPosted in: Psychosocial

HONcode certification seal.