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Diabetes Developments - A blog on latest developments in diabetes by David Mendosa

Using the Good Stress of Fasting for Diabetes Control

May 28th, 2015 · 18 Comments

We can use the stress of intermittent fasting to manage diabetes better.

empty-plate

Lots of stress is bad for anyone and especially for those of us who have diabetes. But ironically some stress is healthful. That’s especially true about intermittent fasting.

High levels of stress lead to high levels of blood sugar of people with diabetes. There really is a “stress-diabetes connection.”

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Another Way to Reach Diabetes Remission

May 25th, 2015 · 2 Comments

Two studies by researchers at the UK’s Newcastle University show that eating an extremely low-calorie diet for a few weeks can send your type 2 diabetes into remission. These studies show that while a very low-carb diet may be the usual way to reach remission, it’s not the only way.

Liver

Source: Blausen.com staff. “Blausen gallery 2014.0″ Wikiversity Journal of Medicine. DOI:10.15347/wjm/2014.010. ISSN 20018762.

While these new studies are known as the 600-calorie diet, the way that they work is that when we lose a substantial amount of weight, we get rid of the fat that surrounds our liver. This in turn restores our liver insulin sensitivity and beta-cell insulin secretion.

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Vitamin D Relieves the Pain of Peripheral Neuropathy

May 22nd, 2015 · 6 Comments

Your painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy can mean that you have a low level of vitamin D. But when you get enough vitamin D3, you might feel a lot better.

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If you have had diabetes for a few years, you probably have neuropathy, because this is perhaps the most common complication of diabetes, striking more than half of us. You probably know if you have it, either from chronic pain or because a doctor told you.

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Pedometer Motivation for Diabetes Management

May 9th, 2015 · 7 Comments

When we wear a pedometer we can get the motivation we need to manage diabetes better. My friend John is the best example I know.

I recently visited him in Northern California for five days. Since each of us have both type 2 diabetes and like to get out in nature a lot, I thought that we might take some walks together.  But I had no idea how many, because I hadn’t known about his new pedometer.

Now that he wears a pedometer all the time, he hikes almost every day. And every day that we spent together, we got out in the woods or on the beach. He took me on seven hikes, one that took us nine hours to finish.

John Hikes from the Skyline to the Sea

His pedometer motivates him to count his daily steps. The longest hike we took together measured 39,000 steps and took us well over 13 miles, many of them much more challenging that where I took the photograph above. I wrote about that great hike in “From the Skyline to the Sea” in my Fitness and Photography for Fun blog.

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Eggs Are Good Before and After Getting Diabetes

May 8th, 2015 · 5 Comments

People with diabetes can benefit from eating two eggs a day without worsening cholesterol levels. And if you have pre-diabetes, eating eggs can help you avoid getting the disease.

Two new studies in a professional journal separately came to these conclusions. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, one of the world’s leading nutrition and dietetics medical journals, published them this month. The pre-diabetes study, published online on April 1 ahead of print at “Egg consumption and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in men,” comes from researchers in Finland. The diabetes study, published in the April issue of the journal at “The effect of a high-egg diet on cardiovascular risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes,” comes from researchers in Australia.

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Drink Chocolate to Manage Diabetes

May 3rd, 2015 · 43 Comments

Chocolate can reduce our insulin resistance, which leads to type 2 diabetes, and improve our memory. What we need from the chocolate are the nutrients called flavanols, as I wrote at Cocoa Can Help Prevent Type 3 Diabetes.

My article reviewed some exciting new research, the full text of which is free online at “Cocoa flavanol consumption.” This was a high-quality study, one that was randomized and  double-blind and included 90 people who for eight weeks consumed either 48 mg, 520 mg, or 993 mg of flavanols in a drink. Those people in the intermediate and high intake groups showed clear improvements in insulin resistance, memory, as well as in  blood pressure and lipid profiles.

But not just any chocolate bar or drink just any cocoa will give us a decent level of flavanols. The problem is that how much good nutrition we get when we eat different chocolates varies tremendously.

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Cocoa Can Help Prevent Type 3 Diabetes

May 2nd, 2015 · 14 Comments

When we eat chocolate, those of us who have diabetes may be able to reduce our insulin resistance and prevent the memory loss that leads to Alzheimer’s Disease, which some scholars are beginning to call type 3 diabetes.

cocoa-beans

Cocoa Beans

Chocolate comes from cocoa beans, which for a good reason has the scientific name meaning “food of the gods.” That’s because the Aztecs, who domesticated it, saw it as a sacred plant, and reserved it for their royalty.

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Diabetes Testing Is Useless

April 17th, 2015 · 25 Comments

Unless people with diabetes are taking insulin, they waste their time and money when they test their blood sugar.

meter

I agree with the conclusions of a review from the Cochrane Collaboration, the most respected group that reviews scientific studies. The review concluded that among people who have had type 2 diabetes for more than one year and aren’t using insulin the effect of testing “is small.” And when they have diabetes longer it makes even less difference. Even worse: no evidence shows that testing “affects patient satisfaction, general well-being, or general health-related quality of life.”

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How Awe and Other Positive Emotions Help Us Manage Diabetes Inflammation

April 14th, 2015 · 11 Comments

The Awe Inspiring Site of the Grand Canyon

The Awe Inspiring Site of the Grand Canyon

(My Photograph from the North Rim)

We manage our diabetes better when we feel positive emotions, the most important of which is awe. This is the conclusion of research that the American Psychological Association’s professional journal Emotion will publish.

Jennifer Stellar, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Toronto, is the lead author of a study linking emotions and those proteins in our bodies that regulate inflammation. It connects with earlier studies had linked those proteins with the development of diabetes.

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The Best Trick to Get Enough Sleep for Diabetes Health

April 13th, 2015 · 7 Comments

Did you really believe that you need to get 7 or 8 hours of sleep every night to for your diabetes health? Most sleep researchers will tell you that. I even parroted their views in my previous article,“How Much Sleep Is Right for You?” But they’re wrong.

When we are wise enough, however, we can trick our body into believing that it has enough rest. In fact, a new study proves that this trick works.

The problem is that most of the experts fail to take into account the multiplier effect of an afternoon nap. But now some them have seen the light. The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism a few days ago published their new study online ahead of print.

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