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Diabetes Developments - A blog on latest developments in diabetes by David Mendosa

Waist Size Is a Better Predictor of Heart Disease

May 15th, 2016 · 1 Comment

When it comes to either your waist or your body mass index, bigger isn’t better. But the size of your waist predicts whether you will get diabetic heart disease even better than the body mass index (BMI) does.

A collaborative team of nine researchers from the Intermountain Heart Institute in Salt Lake City and Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore reported their findings this month at this year’s scientific sessions of the American College of Cardiology. I obtained a copy of the study and the poster presented at the scientific sessions from a representative of the institute.

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→ 1 CommentPosted in: Diabetes Complications

Do Tai Chi for Your Heart

April 29th, 2016 · Comments Off

Credit: Harbor Athletic Club

When you do the ancient Chinese exercise of tai chi, you can minimize your risk of heart problems, the most common and serious complication of diabetes, according to a meta-analysis of 35 randomized clinical trials. Just published in the March 9, 2016, issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association, the study shows that tai chi and other traditional Chinese exercises like qigong can lower the blood pressure, improve the cholesterol and triglyceride levels, boost the quality of life, and reduce the depression of people living with heart disease and stroke.

The improvements in blood pressure and lipid levels were statistically significant. People in the studies reported more satisfaction with their quality of life and lower levels of depression.

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Comments OffPosted in: Exercise For Diabetes

Mindfulness Leads to Better Blood Glucose

April 27th, 2016 · Comments Off

Credit: Pixabay

Better blood glucose levels are linked to mindfulness in a new study by Brown University researchers. Because sustained high blood glucose levels lead to the complications of diabetes and prediabetes, nothing could be more important for us.

The study measured several physical and psychological health indicators in 399 volunteers who participate in the New England Family Study. Eric B. Loucks, PhD, and five colleagues published the study, “Associations of Mindfulness with Glucose Regulation and Diabetes,” in the March 2016 issue of the American Journal of Health Behavior. Dr. Loucks is assistant professor of epidemiology at Brown University’s School of Public Health.

Only the abstract of the study is free online, but on my request a representative of Brown University provided me with a copy of the manuscript that Dr. Loucks had written for publication. This let me learn all the details of the study and provided an analysis of how the findings relate to those of us who have to live with diabetes or prediabetes.

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Comments OffPosted in: Psychosocial

Incompatible Kidney Transplants Offer Survival Benefits

April 16th, 2016 · 1 Comment

Credit: Tareq Salahuddin

Kidney failure is one of the most devastating complications of uncontrolled diabetes. A kidney transplant is the best hope for long-term survival, but finding a compatible donor is almost impossible for some people whose kidneys have failed.

Now, a study that experts have described as “revolutionary” shows that a transplant from an incompatible donor saves many lives. Just last week The New England Journal of Medicine published a long-term study of more than 1,000 transplants of incompatible kidneys that were performed in the past few years at 22 centers. While only the abstract of the study is online, the lead author Dorry Segev, MD, PhD, associate professor of surgery at the Hopkins School of Medicine, sent me the full text upon my request.

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→ 1 CommentPosted in: Diabetes Complications

The High Cost of Diabetes

April 13th, 2016 · 1 Comment

Diabetes isn’t especially expensive because it causes nothing. But uncontrolled diabetes can be one of the most expensive diseases anybody can get.

The visits you have to make to your doctor, the blood glucose meters that you require to check your level, and the prescription medications that most people with diabetes need are only a small part of the economic costs of diabetes.  But all together, these essential components of diabetes management were just one-third of the estimated direct costs of diagnosed diabetes in 2012, the most recent year for which we have data.

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→ 1 CommentPosted in: Diabetes Medication

Four Ways to Make Vegetarian Sandwiches Without Bread

April 12th, 2016 · 13 Comments

If you follow a very low-carb diet, you may have assumed that sandwiches were off limits for you. And if you are also a vegetarian, you were probably certain that they were out of bounds.

Because a sandwich by definition is a light meal made of two pieces of bread with some filling, it’s got to have far too many carbohydrates for those of us who have diabetes. Eating so much bread would blow up our blood glucose level.

Bread is high-carb

Two slices of the typical whole-wheat bread sold in the United States have 24 grams of carbohydrate, and that’s not counting what we put between the slices. Those two slices alone would provide nearly half of the 50 grams of carbohydrates per day in a very low-carb diet.

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→ 13 CommentsPosted in: Diabetes Diet

With Fewer Carbs Means You Take Less Medicine

April 11th, 2016 · 7 Comments

When people with type 2 diabetes follow a low-carb diet, they can substantially reduce how much medicine they need in order to manage this chronic disease. In a new study they needed 40 percent less medicine than a matched group of people who were following the standard high-carb diet.

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A New Meter with Something for All of Us

March 25th, 2016 · 2 Comments

Credit: LifeScan Inc.

Here is a new blood glucose meter that is quick and easy for everyone to use. But it also offers personalized connectivity without wires in a small package that promises to be accurate and precise.

LifeScan just introduced its OneTouch Verio Flex blood glucose meter. I learned a lot about it in a pre-announcement press briefing and received one of these exciting new meters for testing. While my experience with it is limited, I think it will give any of us who have health insurance almost everything that we dream of for our meters.

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→ 2 CommentsPosted in: Diabetes Testing

Avoid Diabetes by Eating Colorful Food

March 24th, 2016 · 1 Comment

Credit: pitchengine.com

People with prediabetes who eat a lot of vegetables and fruits that are high in carotenoids cut their risk of getting type 2 diabetes. This is what three studies published in respected professional journals have concluded.

When we regularly eat vegetables and fruit, they can help us to manage our weight better. When we eat fast food and other stuff high in starch, we are more likely to be too heavy, and being overweight is one of the factors connected with getting diabetes.

But now we know that the antioxidants in the food we eat prevents the oxidation that can damage the cells of our body. Oxidative stress can lead to aging and to serious chronic diseases, including heart disease, cancer, and diabetes.

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→ 1 CommentPosted in: Diabetes Diet

The Most Accurate Blood Glucose Meter

March 16th, 2016 · 27 Comments

Credit: Accu-chek.com

The Accu-Chek Aviva was first in an evaluation of a dozen meters conducted by a team of testing experts at Germany’s University of Ulm led by Guido Freckmann, M.D. It led the field in accuracy and precision.

Few studies of meter accuracy have appeared in the more than 20 years that I have been writing about diabetes. Dr. Freckmann and his team of researchers have been the most relevant, reliable, and prolific in testing our meters. But some of the meters that they evaluated aren’t available in the United States.

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→ 27 CommentsPosted in: Diabetes Testing

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