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Diabetes Developments - A blog on latest developments in diabetes by David Mendosa

Why and How to Fire Your Diabetes Doctor

February 17th, 2017 · Comments Off

Are you unhappy with the way your doctor deals with you? Maybe your doctor doesn’t listen to you or support your low-carb diet. Perhaps you’re tired of being scolded for noncompliance. Or maybe you just don’t like him or her.

You have a choice. When you realize that the relationship that you and your doctor have isn’t working, you have a decision to make.

Should I fire my doctor?

If you want to fire your doctor, you have two choices, and both of them work. You can tell him or her why you are dispensing with his or her services. Or if you tend to avoid confrontation, like I usually do, you can just find another doctor and walk away.

But I hope you won’t have to fire yours. Sharing your concerns about people’s behavior can help if they listen to you. Then, your words can encourage him or her to change.

“Some physicians are open to feedback and can change,” William Polonsky, Ph.D., told me when I met with him. Dr. Polonsky is the president of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute in San Diego and an associate clinical professor of psychology at the University of California, San Diego. “Give them a chance,” he suggests.

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Comments OffPosted in: Psychosocial

Most People with Diabetes Should Stop Iron Supplements

February 16th, 2017 · Comments Off

When you have too much iron in your blood or stored elsewhere in your body might be why your blood glucose level is above normal. In fact, too much iron can even be why you got diabetes. Yet about one out of every five Americans regularly takes an iron supplement.

For years researchers have suspected that when your body accumulates too much iron you are at risk of a host of diseases, according to Berkeley Wellness. In addition to diabetes, iron overload is linked to colorectal cancer, high blood pressure, and hardening of the arteries, as well as to strokes, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Parkinson’s disease.

But only now do we have studies demonstrating the connection between excess iron and diabetes.

“Even mildly elevated body iron contributes to the prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes,” states the news release from the University of Eastern Finland announcing the publication of these studies.

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Comments OffPosted in: Diabetes Medication

What You Must Ask Your Diabetes Doctor

February 15th, 2017 · Comments Off

You need to be prepared to learn as much as you can in the typically short office visit when you go to a new doctor for the first time. Some people actually recommend that you go to your first appointment with a list of 19 or 20 questions to ask the doctor. Be sure to ask your most important ones first because getting answers to that many questions would take hours.

A typical appointment with a doctor in the U.S. is 20.5 minutes, according to a 2015 study. But consider yourself lucky if your appointment is even that long.

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Comments OffPosted in: Diabetes Basics

Why You Probably Don’t Need a Diabetes Specialist

February 14th, 2017 · Comments Off

You may have a big problem when you want to make an appointment with a diabetes specialist. You probably won’t even get an appointment, and if you do, be prepared for a long wait. But you may not need to see one of these specialists.

Doctors who specialize in treating diabetes are called endocrinologists, a mouthful of a word that people with diabetes usually shorten to “endos.” In addition to diabetes, these doctors also treat other endocrine conditions, including osteoporosis and thyroid diseases.

Some endos sub-specialize in diabetes and are called diabetologists. But it’s hard enough to find an endo, and searching for a diabetologist will be even more difficult.

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Comments OffPosted in: Diabetes Basics

Manage with Magical Magnesium

January 26th, 2017 · Comments Off

The benefits of magnesium don’t get enough respect. Until now.

But researchers around over the world published their findings in three different professional journals during November and December 2016.

These three meta-analyses give us more confidence than we could have before that magnesium is important for our diabetes health. If people consumed more magnesium, fewer would have diabetes. Many people who already have diabetes would be better able to manage this condition if they consumed more magnesium. And researchers found additional benefits, including for our hearts.

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Comments OffPosted in: Diabetes Medication

An Unflattering Memento Can Help You Manage Diabetes

January 23rd, 2017 · Comments Off

Vanity isn’t what draws me to look at photos of myself. The one that I look at the most shows me at my worst. I show it here only to encourage you to share your memento.

This unflattering photo shows how I looked in 2004 when I was at a dinner party of the local group of American Mensa, of which I was a member. But this shot shows that I certainly wasn’t smart. Our most important activity was eating, and I did more than my share.

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Comments OffPosted in: Psychosocial

Saturated Fat for Diabetes

January 19th, 2017 · Comments Off

Did you think that saturated fat isn’t good for your health? Actually it is both healthy and satisfying.

A new study by Norwegian researchers that The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published at the end of November 2016 debunks the urban myth that you need to minimize how much saturated fat you eat. The researchers at the University of Bergen found strikingly similar health effects of diets based either on carbohydrates or on fats.

In their randomized controlled trial, 38 men with abdominal obesity followed diets that were high in either carbohydrates or fat, of which about half was saturated. The men in the study had normal fasting glucose.

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Comments OffPosted in: Diabetes Diet

Chill Out to Lose Weight

January 16th, 2017 · Comments Off

Last year was the hottest year on record, although the temperatures in most of the U.S. seem to be rather chilly now. But even if you aren’t too fond of the cold, this seasonal weather can actually be good for people with diabetes.

But we have to know how to take advantage of the chill. Doing so can be easy and yet challenging.

All we have to do is turn down the thermostat. Researchers have discovered that when we get mildly cold, which they define as being cool without shivering, our bodies burn more calories. As a result, managing our weight can be easier.

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Comments OffPosted in: Diabetes Basics, Diabetes Developments, Diabetes Diet

The Way to Reduce Your A1C Fast

December 23rd, 2016 · Comments Off

When you increase how often you check your blood glucose, your A1C level will probably go lower. When you bring your level down to normal — which is somewhere below 6.0 — you are managing your diabetes rather than letting it control your health.

A new study of 211 people demonstrated this positive result. These were the people who responded to a still unpublished survey that the diabetes company, Genteel, sent to 1,500 customers who had purchased a Genteel lancing device. On average, these people reported that their A1C level had dropped from 8.37 to 7.31 — a decrease of about 1.1 percent.

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Comments OffPosted in: Diabetes Testing

Can an Eye Exam Save Your Sight?

December 21st, 2016 · Comments Off

Are you like most of the people who have diabetes? If you are, you probably don’t regularly have a dilated eye exam.

But if you knew that this exam could help prevent 95 percent of diabetes-related vision loss, would you do that?

The National Eye Institute, which is a part of the federal government’s National Institute of Health, tells us that early detection and treatment can reduce the risk of blindness by 95 percent. Diabetic retinopathy can lead to blindness if you don’t get it treated on time.

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Comments OffPosted in: Diabetes Complications

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