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Fitness and Photography for Fun - A blog on staying fit by hiking and doing photography by David Mendosa

On to Caye Caulker

December 21st, 2011 · No Comments

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Our eighth day in Belize started early. We spotted these odd-looking birds with tails almost as long as their bodies and huge bills that are members of the cuckoo family.

We Watched Three Groove-billed Anis Walk Across the Lawn as They Fed on Insects and Seeds

We Watched Three Groove-billed Anis Walk Across the Lawn as They Fed on Insects and Seeds

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Red is my favorite color. So I was delighted to get a good view of the bird below.

Unlike Most Flycatchers, a Vermillion Flycatcher is One of the Most Colorful Birds

Unlike Most Flycatchers, a Vermillion Flycatcher is One of the Most Colorful Birds

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Then, we saw one of the world’s smallest birds. This adult probably weighs just 0.2 ounces.

A Rufous-tailed Hummingbird is Tiny

A Rufous-tailed Hummingbird is Tiny

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Then, we were off. After eight great days in Belize our tour had ended. We took Sandy to the international airport in Belize City.

The International Airport in Belize City Felt Relaxed by American Standards

The International Airport in Belize City Felt Relaxed by American Standards

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While Sharon and I waited for the scheduled departure of the water taxi to Caye Caulker, Glenn accompanied us to lunch at Madda Fish Restaurant. Madda means mother, and the restaurant claims to cook everything in healthy coconut oil.

On the Street in Front of the Restaurant this Rastafarian Prepares its Coconuts

On the Street in Front of the Restaurant this Rastafarian Prepares its Coconuts

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After lunch, when Glenn went home to his wife and children in Crooked Tree, Sharon and I walked around the country’s biggest city for the first time. About 80,000 of the 330,000 people in Belize live in Belize City. On the Caribbean coast, it is the country’s principal port and its financial and industrial hub. It was the capital of British Honduras (as Belize was named before independence), until Belmopan became the new capital in 1970.

A Typical Street Scene in Belize City

A Typical Street Scene in Belize City

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The Water Taxi that Took Us to Caye Caulker is at the Left

The Water Taxi that Took Us to Caye Caulker is at the Left

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The Water Taxi Was Full

The Water Taxi Was Full

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En route to Caye Caulker we passed by a small caye. Somebody on the water taxi told me that an American had purchased it for $30 million.

Somebody's Private Island

Somebody's Private Island

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Caye Caulker has almost no vehicles, except for golf carts like the taxi that took us from the dock to the B&B where we stayed on the island.

Lulu and His Friend Take Us to Our Lodging

Lulu and His Friend Take Us to Our Lodging

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We stayed at a delightful B&B called the Lazy Iguana. A couple named Irene and Mo Miller, originally from Texas, run the B&B and helped us to settle in to the third place we stayed in Belize.

The Lazy Iguana B&B is the Tallest Building on the Island

The Lazy Iguana B&B is the Tallest Building on the Island

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Mo took me right up to the observation deck at the top of the building where he quickly pointed out two unusual birds to me.

A Red-vented Woolpecker at Work

A Red-vented Woodpecker at Work

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A White-Crowned Pigeon Looks Around

A White-Crowned Pigeon Looks Around

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This little island, population about 2,000, felt welcoming. We were off to a great start.

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Posted in: Belize

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