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Fitness and Photography for Fun - A blog on staying fit by hiking and doing photography by David Mendosa

Good Hygiene

October 26th, 2011 · 1 Comment

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Hygiene was good to me this weekend.

It was good for pictures. Hygiene is a little Colorado town with a funny name 18 miles north of Boulder. The town got its name not because it is particularly clean, but rather because the Rev. Jacob Flory established a “hygiene sanitarium” for tuberculosis patients there in 1882. The cool dry air that we have around here is good both for people and nature.

While the ponds at Pella Crossing, which are a mile this side of Hygiene, were my destination, I first drove around the backroads to see what I could see. Along North 59th Street in Hygiene, near where last February I got a favorite shot of a painted silo, I captured this fall scene:

Fall Colors

Fall Colors

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Then, I remembered having seen a huge cottonwood tree along Crane Hollow Road nearby. I didn’t get a satisfactory photo then for a couple of reasons (I didn’t have the right lens with me and the light was wrong). But when I went back there this weekend, it worked.

This “Gentle Giant of Boulder County” is America’s largest plains cottonwood, according to a sign there. It is 105 feet high, according to the sign (95 feet high according to the National Registry of Big Trees) and has a circumference of 36 feet, which is 432 inches). Since the National Registry says that “No image available,” I just sent them this one, which they immediately put online:

The Biggest Plains Cottonwood in the Country

The Biggest Plains Cottonwood in the Country

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Still driving to the ponds at Pella Crossing, I found this hawk perched on top of a pole along Hygiene Road. Using my SUV as a blind, I pulled right underneath the hawk for this shot:

A Red-Tailed Hawk and I Study Each Other

A Red-Tailed Hawk and I Study Each Other

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Reaching the ponds just an hour before the light faded behind the mountains, I broke a “rule” of photography and shot into the sun. This worked too:

A Trail at Pella Crossing

A Trail at Pella Crossing

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When I reached Webster Pond at Pella Crossing, the few birds remaining for the season were either along the pond’s far side or in the air. So I concentrated on looking up. What I saw was one of our most common birds — but one of the most graceful.

A Gull Flies Over Webster Pond

A Gull Flies Over Webster Pond

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Posted in: Photography

1 response so far ↓

  • 1 Shelley // Nov 2, 2011 at 4:35 pm

    The pic of the trail at Pella Crossing is absolutely gorgeous. Thanks for sharing such a beautiful view!!

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