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Fitness and Photography for Fun - A blog on staying fit by hiking and doing photography by David Mendosa

Great Horned Owls‏

December 28th, 2010 · 1 Comment

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Great Horned Owls may well be the most widely distributed true owl in the Americas, but I never saw one. Until today, when I saw three of them.

Today, my friend Sharon took me to Twin Lakes, northeast of Boulder, where she got a great shot of one four days ago while going alone.

Sharon's Great Horned Owl

Sharon's Great Horned Owl

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The next day, Christmas, I circled around the lakes by myself and carefully looked for owls — with no success. They are so well camouflaged that my untrained eyes failed to see any, if indeed any were present.

Today, however, we were blessed by seeing a pair of owls napping side by side on a branch about 20 feet up.

Two Owls

Two Owls

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But soon another group discovered them. That was too much for one of the owls, who flew away. But we stayed to see and photograph the one who remained.

The Patient Owl

The Patient Owl

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The biggest problem I had was to get the owls to open their eyes and to look at me. Even as I crept closer and closer this owl looked away in apparent distain of that lowly creature down on the ground.

Here is one of the photos that Sharon took and shared with me.

The Photographer at Work Using His New Monopod

The Photographer at Work Using His New Monopod

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She was patient with me as I took 98 shots of the owls between 2:32 p.m. and 3:36 p.m. To me — and probably to her — the time passed in an instant because we were so intent on watching those majestic birds.

Then, she took me to Sawhill Ponds, where she had also seen a Great Horned Owl a few days ago. We found it, or at least one of its relatives, just after the sun went down. Too late for a photograph, I nevertheless learned where — and how — to look for Great Horned Owls.

But then we saw a Red-Tailed Hawk in the distance. Too far away for a photograph in itself, the hawk and the fluffy clouds made a beautiful combination.

A Red-Tailed Hawk Flies Away

A Red-Tailed Hawk Flies Away

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Finally, we saw an upside down world in this pond.

A Sawhill Pond at Sunset

A Sawhill Pond at Sunset

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Posted in: Hiking, Photography

1 response so far ↓

  • 1 Bob Fenton // Dec 31, 2010 at 8:13 pm

    Pictures are great, especially the last one. I also like that your companion photographer knows how to frame a picture.

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