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Fitness and Photography for Fun - A blog on staying fit by hiking and doing photography by David Mendosa

Spring Brook Loop‏

June 7th, 2010 · 1 Comment

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The Spring Brook Loop Trail is one of my favorite foothills hikes. For starters, it’s less than 6 miles by road from my apartment in south Boulder, and a bird could fly there in 4 miles.

It is a lollipop loop, meaning that I see most of the trail only one time. The trail offers varied scenery, starting in the plains and passing through hills covered with the wildflowers of late spring before climbing moderately up to a pine forest. The total distance is about 5 or 6 miles, providing a nice workout.

The only problem with the Spring Brook Loop comes after a rain, when the trail turns into thick, slippery clay. But today’s weather was clear and cool when I hit the trail at 6 a.m., although Boulder warmed up to 89 degrees this afternoon.

This is the third time that I have written about my love affair with this trail. My earlier photo essays are www.mendosa.com/fitnessblog/?p=2936 in December 2008, just after the city officially inaugurated the trail, and www.mendosa.com/fitnessblog/?p=3839 last May.

On the plains the cactus stalks are blooming.

Cactus in Bloom

Cactus in Bloom

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When I saw these two stalks leaning into each other, I anthropomorphized, thinking “cactus kiss.” But it’s really more of a cactus hug.

Cactus Hug

Cactus Hug

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The ladybugs love the cactus stalks. And each other.

The ladybugs love the cactus stalks. And each other.

Ladybugs Mating

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Up on the flower-covered hills I discovered only the second copper mallow I’ve ever seen.

An Uncommon Orange Flower, the Copper Mallow

An Uncommon Orange Flower, the Copper Mallow

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Blanketflowers aren’t too common either.

A Blanketflower

A Blanketflower

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In the forest grow fewer flowers. But one of my favorites grow there. The coralroot is one of only two wild orchids native to Colorado.

A Coralroot Orchid

A Coralroot Orchid

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In the forest I came across a small group of what are called mule deer because of their ears. With these big ears they sure hear well. This one responded to ever click of my camera’s shutter.

My, What Big Ears You Have!

My, What Big Ears You Have!

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This bird standing on the top of a pine tree not only looks beautiful but also has a beautiful song.

A Western Meadowlark

A Western Meadowlark

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So, I got a few pictures. Just as important I got some wonderful outdoor activity on a delightful day.

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Posted in: Photography

1 response so far ↓

  • 1 Robert Fenton // Jun 16, 2010 at 11:26 pm

    My wife says how can 2 ladybugs have offspring? Why don’t we have gentlemen bugs? Her sense of humor gets me sometimes.

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