It appears that you are currently using Ad Blocking software. What are the consequences? Click here to learn more.
Fitness and Photography for Fun - A blog on staying fit by hiking and doing photography by David Mendosa

Wild Horses and People‏

June 2nd, 2010 · 1 Comment

Print This Post Print This Post
Advertisment


Unlike domesticated horses, many of which have suffered abuse at the hands of humans, wild horses will not intentionally hurt us. The horses and the humans were each inquisitive about the other, but neither were afraid. That was something really special in wildlife photography.

I was always comfortable around the mustangs that I went to South Dakota to photograph, even to the extent of laying down in their midst to photograph them so I could get the sky in the background. Perhaps, however, I did get too close to the stallions at one time when they were racing and fighting. I once saw two racing stallions literally crash through a group of grazing mares.

Karen Sussman, the president of the International Society for the Protection of Mustangs and Burros, was with us on Wednesday afternoon when the mustangs were exceptionally frisky. I had staked out a position quite close to them, and she suggested that for my safety I back off. I did, but only after getting my dramatic series in which one of the fighting stallions fell over backwards.

Karen herself moved in close to some mustangs that weren’t fighting:

Karen and Friends

Karen and Friends

Click on the picture above to enlarge

So did Weldon Lee, who led our photo safari:

This Mustang Was Weldon's Favorite

This Mustang Was Weldon's Favorite

Click on the picture above to enlarge

Lori Huff was the trip’s co-leader. Her fingers apparently smell nice:

Inspecting Lori's Finger

Inspecting Lori's Finger

Click on the picture above to enlarge

I took Weldon’s advice to heart that we could get better photos from a low angle. So, here are a couple of shots that my friend Marge Maagoe took of me:

Shooting a Colt (Photo by Marge Maagoe; Used by Permission)

Shooting a Colt (Photo by Marge Maagoe; Used by Permission)

Click on the picture above to enlarge

But to get a better angle of my shots I often got even lower, in fact as low as possible. In the photo below you can’t see my face or my camera, but you can rest assured that I wasn’t sleeping:

Lying Down on the Job (Photo by Marge Maagoe; Used by Permission)

Lying Down on the Job (Photo by Marge Maagoe; Used by Permission)

Click on the picture above to enlarge

This then is fifth of my five photo essays about the wild Spanish mustangs that I had the opportunity to photograph in South Dakota last week. Now I’m wondering how close I can get to polar bears.

The Mustangs Were Also Curious About Me (Photo by Connie Redak; Used by Permission)

The Mustangs Were Also Curious About Me (Photo by Connie Redak; Used by Permission)

Click on the picture above to enlarge

This then is fifth of my five photo essays about the wild Spanish mustangs that I had the opportunity to photograph in South Dakota last week. Now I’m wondering how close I can get to polar bears.

Share

Posted in: Photography, South Dakota

1 response so far ↓

  • 1 Shaylon Marie Kampman // Sep 10, 2012 at 9:20 am

    I think it is amazing for humans to get so close to wild horses such as the ones above it is one of my dreams to do something like that as a young photographer.

Leave a Comment