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Fitness and Photography for Fun - A blog on staying fit by hiking and doing photography by David Mendosa

Some Kingfishers

November 26th, 2013 · No Comments

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This was a much better day in Amazonia than the previous days. In a nutshell, we had no rain, no mosquitoes, much sun, and many birds. And I was well.

We started the morning by going up the creek. Namely, Nauta Creek, a shallow tributary of the Marañon River, which is one of the two rivers that form what is named the Amazon River. The level of the creek was so low in several places that we had to move as close to the bow as possible so the outboard motor at the stern of the skiff could clear the bottom.

Just after sunrise at the entrance to Nauta Creek I spotted a sleepy Amazon kingfisher.

A Male Amazon Kingfisher Wakes Up

A Male Amazon Kingfisher Wakes Up

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Later, the kingfishers were more active.

A Female Amazon Kingfisher Proves that She Can Fish

A Female Amazon Kingfisher Proves that She Can Fish

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Amazon kingfishers aren’t the only kingfishers in Amazonia. Another beautiful but uncommon species is the ringed kingfisher.

A Female Ringed Kingfisher Talks

A Female Ringed Kingfisher Talks

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The third of the five species of kingfishers in Amazonia was a lucky find. The green-and-rufous kingfisher is “rare to uncommon and difficult to detect,” according to my field guide, Birds of Peru.

A Green-and-Rufous Kingfisher Perches in the Canopy

A Green-and-Rufous Kingfisher Perches in the Canopy

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Nauta Creek was so productive in our early morning skiff journey that we went back right after breakfast.

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Posted in: Amazon, Peru

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