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Fitness and Photography for Fun - A blog on staying fit by hiking and doing photography by David Mendosa

Captain Cook State Recreation Area

October 13th, 2013 · No Comments

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One day while I was visiting my friends Marveen and Wayne at their home near Nikiski, Alaska, I drove about 15 miles to the end of the road at Captain Cook State Recreation Area. I timed my arrival for low tide, the best time to walk on beaches. The tide was way out at minus 5.6 feet and, no one else was there, so I had plenty of room to roam.

Earlier, Marveen had taken me to the overlook, because she wanted to show me the rocks on the beach there. “The boulders, common to the area and called glacial erratics for their random placement across the landscape, were deposited by glaciers from the west side of Cook Inlet,” according to an article in the local newspaper. But that day wasn’t great for photography, so I needed to go back.

Mt. Spurr, an 11,000 Foot Volcano, Rises Across Cook Inlet from Glacial Erratics at Captain Cook State Recreation Area

Mt. Spurr, an 11,000 Foot Volcano, Rises Across Cook Inlet from Glacial Erratics at Captain Cook State Recreation Area

Click on the picture above to enlarge

About one and one-half miles down the beach I got as far as I could go. The mouth of the Swanson River blocked my way. But it attracted birds.

A Sandpiper Where the Swanson River and Cook Inlet Meet

A Sandpiper Where the Swanson River and Cook Inlet Meet

Click on the picture above to enlarge

Beaches turned out to be one of my favorite places on the Kenai Peninsula for hiking. They are one of the few places in Alaska where people are unlikely to surprise bears.

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