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Fitness and Photography for Fun - A blog on staying fit by hiking and doing photography by David Mendosa

Dipnetting

October 10th, 2013 · No Comments

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The Kenai River, which flows for 82 miles to its outlet into the Cook Inlet of the Pacific Ocean near the city of Kenai, is the most popular sport fishing destination in Alaska, particularly for salmon. This river is known for its large fish, and in 1985 one fisherman caught the world record king salmon, which weighed about 97 pounds, here.

But red salmon, also known as sockeye, are considered the premier salmon for eating, canning, and smoking. They were running when I was there. And many Alaska residents were running after them.

This is the short and intense dipnet season. It began on July 10 and ended on July 31.

“The beach along the Kenai River is a makeshift village of tents, tarps, coolers, and folding chairs,” NPR reported. “In the water, a snaking line of dipnetters, poised like great blue herons, use gigantic butterfly nets to scoop up huge sockeye salmon. During dipnet season, covering just a few weeks a year in Alaska, residents are allowed to fish with homemade nets attached to long metal poles….They’re generally able to wrestle ashore enough salmon to last the winter once it’s canned, frozen, or smoked.”

Wayne and Marveen had told me about it too. He is such an avid fisherman that during my visit he went dipnetting as well as fishing upstream and on some of the peninsula’s many lakes from his boat.

Dipnetters Seeking Salmon at the Mouth of the Kenai River

Dipnetters Seeking Salmon at the Mouth of the Kenai River

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A Fish in the Net is Worth Dozens in the River

A Fish in the Net is Worth Dozens in the River

Click on the picture above to enlarge
A Fish in the Net is Worth Dozens in the River

Success!

Click on the picture above to enlarge

Alaskans seem to have a different way to have fun than people in the lower 48 do. But those people in the far north also know the best way to stock their larder with some of the world’s best fish.

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