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Fitness and Photography for Fun - A blog on staying fit by hiking and doing photography by David Mendosa

Adams County Regional Park

November 25th, 2012 · No Comments

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Sharon and I returned to Adams County Regional Park on the morning of Thanksgiving Day. She had introduced me to this oasis in June 2010. About 30 miles east of here out on the high plains, this park has three or four lakes and one river.

The river is the South Platte, which flows into the Platte and thence into the Missouri, the Mississippi, and the Gulf of Mexico. The Platte figures in American history since the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery Expedition travelled it as far as possible as did the immigrants to the West in the years before the railroads came. Noted as being “a mile wide and an inch deep,” the river where we saw it wasn’t quite so wide and a bit deeper.

The South Platte Flows Through Adams County Regional Park (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 100mm, f/16, 1/250, ISO 400)

The South Platte Flows Through Adams County Regional Park (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 100mm, f/16, 1/250, ISO 400)

Click on the picture above to enlarge

As we crossed a bridge over one of the lakes we noticed a flock of Northern Shovelers.

Two Female Northern Shovelers (Anas clypeata) Surround a Male (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 100mm, f/8, 1/1500, ISO 400)

Two Female Northern Shovelers (Anas clypeata) Surround a Male (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 100mm, f/8, 1/1500, ISO 400)

Click on the picture above to enlarge

Then, at the very end of our walk around the lakes and river, Sharon spotted an American Kestrel straight ahead of us. Approaching slowly and careful so as not to spook this beautiful little bird, I was able to get within 12 steps of him for this shot.

An American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) Perches on a Post (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 320mm, f/8, 1/2000, ISO 400)

An American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) Perches on a Post (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 320mm, f/8, 1/2000, ISO 400)

Click on the picture above to enlarge

But the kestrel was hungry. This little raptor flew away in search of breakfast.

The American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) Flies Away (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 270mm, f/8, 1/2000, ISO 400)

The American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) Flies Away (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 270mm, f/8, 1/2000, ISO 400)

Click on the picture above to enlarge

Since my Canon 7D camera can take 8 frames per second, I was able to get a few shots of the bird. In fact, I took 786 photos at Adams County Regional Park on Thanksgiving, of which 509 were of this one kestrel. Not a bad morning’s work, and the results are something for which I’m thankful.

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