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Fitness and Photography for Fun - A blog on staying fit by hiking and doing photography by David Mendosa

Fall Comes to Boulder

October 7th, 2012 · 6 Comments

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For two days Boulder’s typically sunny skies went elsewhere. Instead, cold weather, rain, and a dusting of snow appeared, each heralding the arrival of fall.

Then, today the sun returned, and it was seemingly brighter than ever. Temperatures in the mid-50s replaced those near freezing.

The weather called for me to go outside. It called so loudly that both my camera and my Kindle heard it.

My Kindle reminded me that a few months ago I had discovered a reading bench with a great view overlooking the Coot Lake wetlands. A little loop around the lake and the wetlands gave both my Kindle and my camera something to do en route to the bench this afternoon.

My Kindle showed me a book about birds that I have been reading. When I looked up from the screen to the beautiful landscape, I saw real birds. They were all common species — robins, blackbirds, and ducks. But I didn’t expect more, so I was happy.

Once when I looked up I saw a robin in the closest tree. Most photographers won’t bother with such common birds, but I always will. I always hope to see them do something special. This one spread its wings for me.

An American Robin (Turdus migratorius) Says It Likes Russian Olives (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 400mm, f/8, 1/4000th, ISO 800)

An American Robin (Turdus migratorius) Says It Likes Russian Olives (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 400mm, f/8, 1/4000th, ISO 800)

Click on the picture above to enlarge

While I chose the bench for reading, when I looked up I couldn’t help but see the fall colors. This shot came to me within a few steps of my reading bench.

The Path from Coot Lake to Boulder Reservoir (Canon 7D with 18-200mm lens at 28mm, f/16, 1/125, ISO 400)

The Path from Coot Lake to Boulder Reservoir (Canon 7D with 18-200mm lens at 28mm, f/16, 1/125, ISO 400)

Click on the picture above to enlarge

Completing the loop around Coot Lake, my camera stopped me when it saw how the lake gave up its blue color to match that of the turning trees.

Coot Lake Reflects Fall Color (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 100mm, f/16, HDR, ISO 800)

Coot Lake Reflects Fall Color (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 100mm, f/16, HDR, ISO 800)

Click on the picture above to enlarge

Just before leaving the lake, my camera, my Kindle, and I each turned to look back almost into the sun as it sank low on the horizon. The rules are that you don’t shoot into the sun and that when you shoot a lake, you have to give the viewer some place in the foreground to stand. Sometimes you have to break the rules.

Mallards Swim (Anas platyrhynchos) on Coot Lake before the Front Range (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 135mm, f/16, 1/350th, ISO 800)

Mallards Swim (Anas platyrhynchos) on Coot Lake before the Front Range (Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens at 135mm, f/16, 1/350th, ISO 800)

Click on the picture above to enlarge
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Posted in: Photography

6 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Dan Hunter // Nov 1, 2012 at 11:37 am

    Hi David, Your periodic letters always give me a lift because of the useful and interesting content. I’m type 2 and always have to learn and re-learn the rules of eating…fewer carbs and a lot less protein. It doesn’t help being a food addict either. Every day is a struggle, some quite successful, some a near disaster. But you help me to carry on. Your pictures successfully display your strong artistic side. And thanks for telling us about each shot’s camera setup.
    Regards,
    Dan Hunter
    Vancouver BC

  • 2 David Mendosa // Nov 1, 2012 at 12:22 pm

    Dear Dan,

    It gets easier to avoid foods high in carbs with time. I found for me that my big breakthrough was when I stopped eating all grains. The craving for them disappeared.

    Thanks for your comment on the camera settings that I recently added. I did it to help other photographers like you.

    Namaste,

    David

  • 3 Pat Moore // Nov 1, 2012 at 3:52 pm

    David, if you’ve stopped eating all grains, what is your typical breakfast made up of, please.

  • 4 David Mendosa // Nov 1, 2012 at 4:29 pm

    Dear Pat,

    My usual breakfast is two poached eggs, 4 oz. of smoked wild salmon with capers added, and a little kimchi.

    Namaste,

    David

  • 5 Lisa Salim // Nov 1, 2012 at 9:56 pm

    I don’t know which I appreciate more, the diabetes information in the newsletter or the links to your photography.

    Coot Lake Reflects Fall Color is breath taking.

  • 6 David Mendosa // Nov 2, 2012 at 5:41 am

    Dear Lisa,

    Thank you. I’m glad that you like both, because I post my photo essays to encourage people — particularly people with diabetes — to get out in nature and get the activity we all need.

    Namaste,

    David

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