It appears that you are currently using Ad Blocking software. What are the consequences? Click here to learn more.
Diabetes Developments - A blog on latest developments in diabetes by David Mendosa

A Short Walk Goes a Long Way

July 8th, 2009 · 1 Comment

We can reverse one of the most common and insidious complications of diabetes when we walk just a little more. From 50 to 70 percent of people with type 2 diabetes and 95 percent of those who are obese have fatty liver. But up to 77 percent of people who have fatty liver don’t have any symptoms.

A study that the journal Hepatology just published in its July issue put 141 participants through an exercise program for three months. The participants had nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), sometimes called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

If it leads to cirrhosis of the liver, it’s fatal, unless you are lucky enough to get a liver transplant. Liver transplants may be available for people under 70 and my wife was only 69 when her doctor told her that she had cirrhosis. But he also told her that her weight makes a successful transplant unlikely, so two years ago she died from this awful complication of diabetes. [Read more →]

Share

Tags: , , ,
Posted in: Diabetes Complications, Exercise For Diabetes

Inflammation: The Root of Diabetes

June 7th, 2009 · 2 Comments

More and more research pinpoints inflammation as a root cause of type 2 diabetes. Being overweight makes it harder for us to control our diabetes, but that can’t be what causes it. Since a lot more people are overweight or obese than have diabetes, weight alone can’t lead to diabetes.

No one ever demonstrated that obesity causes diabetes or even insulin resistance. In my most recent book, Losing Weight with Your Diabetes Medication, I speculated that essentially it might be the other way around: That what makes so many of us overweight could be insulin resistance or impaired beta cells.

Type 2 diabetes generally results from the combination of impaired beta cell function and insulin resistance acting on susceptible genes. Why then is there such a large overlap between being heavy and type 2 diabetes?
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , ,
Posted in: Diabetes Diet

Welcoming Welchol

May 20th, 2009 · 7 Comments

A year ago the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new drug to treat type 2 diabetes. But few of us ever heard of it.

Until now. Studies presented at the annual convention of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists in Houston on Friday finally caught our attention.

The senior author of one of those studies spoke at length with me at the convention. Yehuda Handelsman, an endocrinologist in private practice in Tarzana, California, led a 16-week multi-center international study comparing how well Welchol (colesevelam HCl), Avandia, and Januvia did. In the study they randomized 169 people to evaluate the effects of these three oral diabetes medications on glycemic control and lipid profiles when added to metformin.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , ,
Posted in: Diabetes Medication

The Vitamin D Window

May 18th, 2009 · 7 Comments

When he examined the young lifeguard, he saw that almost every square inch of her body was well tanned. She had been wearing practically nothing when she worked at the beach.

Neil Binkley, M.D., told me about his patient because she had the highest physiologic level of vitamin D in her system of anyone he ever saw. Her level was 80 ng/ml.

I had to look up the word “physiologic” to make sure what Dr. Binkley meant. Physiologic in the sense that he’s using it is “something that is normal, neither due to anything pathologic nor significant in terms of causing illness,” according to a medical dictionary.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in: Diabetes Medication

Power of Prevention

May 14th, 2009 · 3 Comments

The annual convention of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists — those medical specialists who treat diabetes — is underway in Houston. I’m covering the event for The Health Central Network.

The convention took over the George R. Brown Convention Center in the downtown of America’s fourth largest city. The convention center is so big that after Hurricane Katrina 7,000 refugees lived here.

In the mob of today’s convention you might imagine my surprise that the first person I made eye contact with asked if I was David Mendosa. The person who asked was Sarah Senn, who I had sent several photos for an article that she wrote about me. But we had never previously met in person.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in: People With Diabetes

Diabetes Drug Dangers

April 19th, 2009 · 8 Comments

A single research report that found risks in one of the medications that we take to control our diabetes would warrant our attention. But when three separate studies find serious side effects from all our major drugs, the time is right for us to reconsider how we control our blood glucose levels.

Most of us think of our diabetes drugs, diet, and exercise as the three basic ways we do that. But drugs come first. Maybe they should come last, at least for all of us with type 2 diabetes, who unlike type 1s have a choice.

Since March 10, studies have called into question the side effects of metformin, the glitazones, insulin, and the sulfonylureas.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in: Diabetes Medication

Drinking Less to Lose Weight

April 8th, 2009 · 1 Comment

Earlier studies that I reviewed here indicated that when we take our food in liquid form rather than in a solid one, we consume more calories that day. And now a big new study shows that when we cut back on the amount of liquid calories that we consume, we do lose weight.

But, unlike the earlier studies, the new one finds only one liquid culprit: sugar-sweetened beverages. No other type of beverage is associated with a change in weight.

This is good news for people with diabetes. More than 85 percent of us are overweight or obese, according to a survey by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , ,
Posted in: Diabetes Diet

Comparing Insulins for Type 2s

April 5th, 2009 · 4 Comments

Some of our doctors don’t help us when they use insulin as a threat: “Unless you reduce your blood glucose, I am going to have to put you on insulin.”

So it’s no surprise that many of us who have type 2 diabetes think we have failed when our doctors prescribe it. This comes from thinking of injecting insulin as a last resort.

It isn’t. More and more of us are now starting to take insulin as soon as our doctors have diagnosed our type 2 diabetes. Probably half of the men in my diabetes support group started taking insulin as a first choice.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in: Diabetes Medication

Shameless

March 29th, 2009 · No Comments

Aren’t you ashamed of yourself?

Most of us can still remember those words of admonishment from our mothers years ago. And many of us berate our kids with that phrase now.

When what we do is bad — when we violate the Golden Rule — the innate sense of shame that all normal people have can lead us back to ethical behavior. This normal human emotion can bring us to maturity in our actions.

But many of us are ashamed of who we are or the diseases we have. We feel shame about the physical condition of our bodies.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , ,
Posted in: Psychosocial

Saving our Brains

February 22nd, 2009 · No Comments

Many of us who have diabetes are more in tune with our minds than our bodies. We are “not athletic.” Many of us will frankly acknowledge that we are “into our heads.”

Now its clear that we can’t have a good head on our shoulders without having good shoulders and all. Our diabetic body will give us a diabetic mind — if we let it. And when we control our diabetes, not only our bodies but also our brains work better.

A diabetic body has high blood glucose. When we succeed in bringing our blood glucose level down to normal, our bodies aren’t diabetic any more. When our diabetes is controlled, it may not be cured, but it’s certainly in such remission that no tests would show that it’s diabetic.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , , ,
Posted in: Psychosocial

HONcode certification seal.