It appears that you are currently using Ad Blocking software. What are the consequences? Click here to learn more.
Diabetes Developments - A blog on latest developments in diabetes by David Mendosa

Three Thousand Steps in Thirty Minutes

March 25th, 2009 · 2 Comments

Like most people, I used my pedometer passively to note how many steps I took each day. Now I use it as a prod for better performance and to help control my diabetes.

We can use pedometers to motivate us to get enough of the moderate-intensity physical activity we need. The government’s official 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, which I covered here last year, calls for us to get a minimum of 150 minutes of this moderate-intensity exercise each week. That can work out to 30 minutes on five days of the week. We can also get it in shorter bouts, typically of 10 minutes each time.

But many of us can’t figure out what “moderate-intensity” means. Until I read a brand new research report, I certainly didn’t.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: ,
Posted in: Exercise For Diabetes

On the Road

March 22nd, 2009 · 2 Comments

Last night I returned from my first long road trip since learning I have diabetes. Trying to eat as well as I could and making time for enough exercise every day were the challenges that I had not addressed before.

On the last leg of my 4,500 mile journey I was musing last night about these challenges and what I had learned about them and myself. I was on the road for 27 days, traveling alone, except for my SUV, my laptop computer, my camera, and other essentials.

Traveling in the off-season gave me tremendous flexibility. Nowhere were the highways or parks crowded, except at the Grand Canyon. I can only imagine with dread what the crowds of summer will be there. Never once did I need to make a motel or restaurant reservation.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , ,
Posted in: Psychosocial

Emotional Diabetes

March 9th, 2009 · No Comments

We think about controlling our diabetes with diet and exercise and usually with medication too. Seldom do we even consider the fourth leg.

But a study published in the latest issue of the Annals of Behavioral Medicine and a forthcoming one by a Ph.D. student who just wrote me emphasizes the importance of our emotions for controlling our diabetes. Emotional health and diabetes health are a two-way street — a bidirectional relationship. When our emotional level is positive, we can more easily control our diabetes. And when we control our diabetes, we feel better.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , , ,
Posted in: Psychosocial

Saving our Brains

February 22nd, 2009 · No Comments

Many of us who have diabetes are more in tune with our minds than our bodies. We are “not athletic.” Many of us will frankly acknowledge that we are “into our heads.”

Now its clear that we can’t have a good head on our shoulders without having good shoulders and all. Our diabetic body will give us a diabetic mind — if we let it. And when we control our diabetes, not only our bodies but also our brains work better.

A diabetic body has high blood glucose. When we succeed in bringing our blood glucose level down to normal, our bodies aren’t diabetic any more. When our diabetes is controlled, it may not be cured, but it’s certainly in such remission that no tests would show that it’s diabetic.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , , ,
Posted in: Psychosocial

The Normal A1C Level

February 11th, 2009 · 500 Comments

You want to control your diabetes as much as possible. You wouldn’t be reading this if you didn’t.

So you regularly check your A1C level. This is the best measurement of our blood glucose control that we have now. It tells us what percentage of our hemoglobin — the protein in our red blood cells that carry oxygen — has glucose sticking to it. The less glucose that remains in our bloodstream rather than going to work in the cells that need it the better we feel now and the better our health will continue to be.

As we are able to control our diabetes better and better, the reasonable goal is to bring our A1C levels down to normal — the A1C level that people who don’t have diabetes have. But before we can even set that goal, we have to know what the target is.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , , ,
Posted in: Diabetes Testing

Positive Motivation

February 4th, 2009 · 4 Comments

You need to help me a lot with this one.

All of you who read my articles here are motivated to control your diabetes. Almost all of you have a positive motivation. I doubt if many of you have a primarily negative motivation based on fear of the consequences of uncontrolled diabetes. Negative motivations just don’t keep us doing what we need to do for long.

What are your positive motivations? What do you tell people you know who have diabetes to encourage them to tame it?
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in: Diabetes Basics

i-SENS is Coming

January 14th, 2009 · 1 Comment

i-SENS Inc. is coming to the United States. It should mean better and less expensive blood glucose meters and strips for all of us who have diabetes. But it may also be confusing.

Just don’t confuse this big Korean company with iSense Corp., in Wilsonville, Oregon. That start-up company is developing a minimally-invasive continuous blood glucose monitor.

i-SENS is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of blood glucose meters. Their manufacturing facilities in Korea have production capacity on the order of one billion strips per year. That’s in the same league as the big four brands, LifeScan, Accu-Chek, Bayer, and Abbott.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: ,
Posted in: Diabetes Testing

Good News About Non-Caloric Sweeteners

January 7th, 2009 · 10 Comments

The most comprehensive study ever about those sweeteners that don’t have any calories just appeared as the lead “original research communication” in the January 2009 issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. It is really good news for anyone with diabetes who is trying to lose weight or maintain weight loss.

This study changed my mind about using non-caloric sweeteners. A little more than a year ago I wrote here that, “The classic 1969 experiment by Stylianos Nicolaïdis showed that merely tasting a sweet substance – whether it is sugar or a non-caloric sweetener – causes rats to secrete insulin.” The problem with that is that more circulating insulin can make us hungry so that we will probably eat more.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: , , ,
Posted in: Diabetes Diet

Avoiding Flu Vaccine Toxicity

December 14th, 2008 · 10 Comments

When I recommended here a month ago that we all get vaccinated against influenza this year, I had no idea how much controversy it would stir up. Some of the concerns are legitimate, but we have alternatives. Other concerns stem from irresponsible rants on the Internet that I’ve traced back to a totally discredited South Carolina doctor.

My article here last month jumped the gun. I knew that the flu authorities at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) wanted to talk with me so that I could help get the word out. But since CDC and the Health Central Network weren’t able to work out the arrangement in time, I wrote then because the flu season was already upon us.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: ,
Posted in: Diabetes Medication

Experiencing Life Fully

December 3rd, 2008 · No Comments

A character in a Woody Allen play says, “It’s not that I am afraid to die, I just don’t want to be there when it happens.” Until recently those were my sentiments exactly.

But I have just begun to realize how my whole life has revolved around experiencing it. Since death is the final experience, I do want to be there when it happens.

A friend of mine, Jeff, who is working on an advanced degree, interviewed me last month. After reading my online autobiography, he structured the interview around how much my life has changed — how much I have experienced. I’ve always made sure to do interesting things — maybe because I have never thought of myself as being an interesting person.
[Read more →]

Share

Tags: ,
Posted in: Psychosocial

HONcode certification seal.