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Diabetes Developments - A blog on latest developments in diabetes by David Mendosa

Entries Tagged as 'Psychosocial'

How Awe and Other Positive Emotions Help Us Manage Diabetes Inflammation

April 14th, 2015 · 2 Comments

The Awe Inspiring Site of the Grand Canyon

The Awe Inspiring Site of the Grand Canyon

(My Photograph from the North Rim)

We manage our diabetes better when we feel positive emotions, the most important of which is awe. This is the conclusion of research that the American Psychological Association’s professional journal Emotion will publish.

Jennifer Stellar, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Toronto, is the lead author of a study linking emotions and those proteins in our bodies that regulate inflammation. It connects with earlier studies had linked those proteins with the development of diabetes.

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Posted in: Psychosocial

The Best Trick to Get Enough Sleep for Diabetes Health

April 13th, 2015 · 1 Comment

Did you really believe that you need to get 7 or 8 hours of sleep every night to for your diabetes health? Most sleep researchers will tell you that. I even parroted their views in my previous article,“How Much Sleep Is Right for You?” But they’re wrong.

When we are wise enough, however, we can trick our body into believing that it has enough rest. In fact, a new study proves that this trick works.

The problem is that most of the experts fail to take into account the multiplier effect of an afternoon nap. But now some them have seen the light. The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism a few days ago published their new study online ahead of print.

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Posted in: Psychosocial

How Much Sleep Is Right for You?

April 10th, 2015 · No Comments

People have the smallest risk of getting type 2 diabetes when they get 7 to 8 hours of sleep at night, a new study concludes. Many of us get less than that, and it’s not hard to accept that we need that much. But what’s hard for me to accept is their finding that more than 8 hours of sleep is as bad for us as getting too little sleep.

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This study is a meta-analysis of 10 previous studies that Diabetes Care (a professional journal of the American Diabetes Association) just published in its March 2015 issue. Only the abstract of the study, “Sleep Duration and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes,” is available free online, but my friend and colleague, Dr. Bill Quick, sent me the full-text.

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Posted in: Psychosocial

Too Little Sleep Means Insulin Works Poorly

April 9th, 2015 · 2 Comments

Research published February 19 in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, shows that lack of sleep can elevate levels of free fatty acids in the blood. The full-text of the study, “Sleep restriction increases free fatty acids in healthy men,” is available free online. An earlier study, “Fatty Acids, Obesity, and Insulin Resistance,” connected the dots between fatty acids and diabetes.

They Discover the Cause

This is an important study because it found how and why enough sleep is important for managing our diabetes. When scientists know the mechanism, we can have more confidence in their conclusions.

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Posted in: Psychosocial

Diabetes Support Groups Connect Us

March 16th, 2015 · 13 Comments

When we get diabetes we are even more isolated from our culture than most people are. While this makes finding a solution more difficult for us, but we have a way to get out.

People around the world are fast losing their cultural ties, as I wrote in my most recent articles here, “Diabetes Lessons from Indigenous Cultures” and “Separation from Our Culture Leads to Diabetes.”

Most of us are becoming more isolated from our cultural roots. Consequently, we are losing our sense of community: Community and culture go together.

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Posted in: Psychosocial

Separation from Our Culture Leads to Diabetes

March 12th, 2015 · 6 Comments

The diabetes epidemic in the developed  world is a result of separation from our culture. While the evidence is in plain sight, we have largely ignored it.

Those of us in here who have diabetes are as much subject to the breakdown of culture as the indigenous peoples of the world whose cultural ties broke when they came into contact with us. “Diabetes Lessons from Indigenous Cultures” shows three examples of that collective trauma.

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Posted in: Psychosocial

Diabetes Lessons from Indigenous Cultures

March 8th, 2015 · No Comments

One big reason why you and I have type 2 diabetes may be because we have broken ties to our culture. Another way of saying this is that our Western culture is itself broken.

This remains an hypothesis, but it’s one that follows from research into the basic cause of diabetes among First Nations people of Canada, the Aboriginal Australians, and the Pima Indians of Arizona. Studies are finding a link between cultural collapse and diabetes among indigenous peoples around the world.

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Posted in: Psychosocial

Diabetes Scams and How to Foil Them

February 23rd, 2015 · 1 Comment

If you wanted to make a lot of money fast and weren’t limited by any ethics like honesty, I can’t think of any better target than those of us who have diabetes. I don’t think that we are any more gullible than other people. But we have all the characteristics that scammers value the most:

1. We are a sitting duck. Because diabetes is a long-lasting condition that can be controlled but not cured, it is by definition a chronic disease. Scammers have plenty of time try to tempt us.

2. We represent a big audience for anyone who wants to get into our pockets. One of every 11 Americans have diabetes, a total of about 29 million people. About 21 million of us know that we have diabetes.

3. Diabetes is a growth industry. From 1980 through 2011, the crude prevalence of diagnosed diabetes increased 176 percent.

4. We know that we have to take charge of our health every day and can’t rely on our doctors who we see only every few months. This do-it-yourself ethic leaves us much more vulnerable to unethical people who want our money than people with other health conditions who simply rely on their doctors.

But we aren’t helpless prey. We have an excellent tool that will protect us: our minds. In this post I am trying to add a few tips for you to consider. This post won’t be telling you about the scams that I have encountered. For one thing, I have read literally thousands of these phony pitches. For another, some of the scammers operate on the basis that any publicity is good publicity.

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Posted in: Psychosocial

Journaling for Our Diabetes Health

February 9th, 2015 · No Comments

A couple of years ago I wrote here about how keeping a journal of positive things in our lives can make those of us who have diabetes happier. But writing down the worst things that we experience might help even more.

When we get a diagnosis that we have diabetes, it can be one of our most traumatic experiences. No wonder then that so many of us either go into denial that it’s anything of importance or otherwise panic at the thought of it.

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Posted in: Psychosocial

Are You Thankful for Diabetes?

December 26th, 2014 · 5 Comments

If you aren’t suffering from a complication of diabetes, you actually have every reason to be thankful that you have this dreaded disease. Even if you already have some complications, you can reverse most of them.

Thanks to Leighann Calentine!

In fact, I have been able to reverse two of them: one was a microaneurysm in my left eye, which if I didn’t do anything, could have led to my becoming blind in that eye. The other was some diabetic peripheral neuropathy in my feet; the neuropathy has come and gone. Both complications went away when I redoubled my efforts to reduce my blood sugar.

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Posted in: Psychosocial

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