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Diabetes Developments - A blog on latest developments in diabetes by David Mendosa

Entries Tagged as 'Diabetes Diet'

The New Breakfast for People with Diabetes

March 26th, 2015 · 4 Comments

The usual food that I eat for breakfast has changed because of my new diet. But it’s better for me than the smoked salmon that I ate before. It also tastes even better.

More than seven years ago when I began to follow a very-low carb diet, people told me that it would be hard to stay on. Shortly after I started on it I wrote “Why I Low-carb” for a diabetes magazine. But for me it was no challenge. I still follow a plan of eating no more than six grams of carbohydrate for breakfast, 12 grams for lunch, and 12 grams for dinner — unless I skip dinner altogether on an “Intermittent Fast.”

But even I believed it would be difficult to combine my very low-carb diet with one that is also vegetarian — for ethical reasons I began to do both last November. I wrote about that experiment here at “Vegetarian and Low-Carb Diets for Diabetes.”

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The Trouble with Fructose for Diabetes

March 1st, 2015 · 2 Comments

Now that our doctors and scientists have begun to realize how big a danger that fructose is for us we can hope that the twin epidemics of diabetes and obesity can finally be halted. But for each of us individually the more important message is that we can still save our health if we avoid added fructose.

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The phrase “added fructose” means the fructose that we add to what we eat. The sugar in fruit is of course fructose, but essentially all experts agree that it isn’t a problem because we get that fructose along with fiber, antioxidants, and the other good stuff in whole foods.

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Vegetarian and Low-Carb Diets for Diabetes

January 31st, 2015 · 27 Comments

About a month ago I became a vegetarian. But I am staying with the very low-carb diet that I began in 2007. It makes it possible for me to manage my blood sugar levels and my weight. My motivation for further restricting the variety of foods that I eat was an ethical consideration.

Different people become vegetarians for various reasons. Some people choose to avoid meat, poultry, fish, and seafood for their own health and others for religious, ethical, and environmental concerns.

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Manage Your Diabetes with Diabetes University

January 18th, 2015 · 4 Comments

Ever since 1969 when Richard K. Bernstein became the first person with diabetes to use a blood glucose meter and discover the huge impact that carbohydrates have on our blood sugar, he has been committed to helping the rest of us manage our diabetes. He has helped thousands of patients who have diabetes, written nine books and more than 100 articles about it, and continues to offer free monthly webcasts.

But only now has he established a diabetes university.

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Hunger Is Not the Enemy of Diabetes

January 5th, 2015 · 1 Comment

Hunger can be a big problem when we try to lose weight. But some weight loss strategies cause less hunger than others, and we can actually use whatever hunger we have to work for us when we decide to eat less.

Those of us who have diabetes seem to be continually trying new ways to manage our weight. I think that I tried everything from very low-fat (Dean Ornish’s) and high-starch diets (John McDougall’s) to the Standard American (SAD) and Mediterranean diets. Only when I took a prescription drug (Byetta) and later when I switched to very low-carb, because I wanted to avoid the side effects of drugs, was I able to take off all the weight I needed to lose.

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Skipping Breakfast with Diabetes

December 8th, 2014 · 2 Comments

Skipping breakfast, according to the conventional wisdom, is a mistake for people with diabetes who want to lose weight. But this piece of conventional wisdom may be a myth.

Almost all of us who have type 2 diabetes want to lose weight or make sure to keep off the weight we have lost. Twenty years ago when a doctor first told me that I have diabetes, I weighed over 300 pounds. Eight and one-half years ago I brought my weight down to my goal of 156 (a BMI of 19.8), which is what I weigh today. It has never been easy.

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Snacking with Diabetes

November 16th, 2014 · 4 Comments

A new snack food is now available that is healthy and low carb as well as being tasty. It meets all the criteria that people with diabetes need to consider when we put something in our mouths.

Until now the only good tasting snacks that I knew about were either healthy or low carb, but not both.

1. Nuts and seeds — particularly almonds — deserve their reputation of being healthy. That’s especially true if they are organic so that they aren’t loaded with pesticides and herbicides. But carbs will always spike our blood sugar levels and nobody can tell me that any nuts or seeds are low carb.

In fact, the best tasting nuts that I know about are cashews, particularly when they are roasted and salted, but they are really high in carbs. I still eat a few of them once in a while, and I eat even more almonds. Nuts and seeds make the best trail and trip food because they don’t need refrigeration and don’t squash in a pack.

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Drink Camel Milk for Diabetes Control

November 9th, 2014 · 15 Comments

Camel milk has a great taste. But that’s not why Americans are beginning to drink it.

People with diabetes are drinking it to help us reduce our blood sugar and to reduce the amount of insulin we have to take. Camel milk is one of those rare functional foods that helps us manage our diabetes better.

Camel milk recently became available in the United States. Two years ago the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the sale of camel milk here. This year Desert Farms in Santa Monica, California, became the first camel milk wholesaler in the U.S. It is now on the shelves of natural food stores in California, including 40 Whole Foods Markets in the northern part of that state. By the end of this month Whole Foods will have it in its frozen food cases at 32 stores in Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, and Utah.

Whole Foods only carries pasteurized camel milk, but since raw camel’s milk is legal in California, another retailer in that state, Lassen’s, sells both raw and pasteurized camel milk in its 10 stores. Desert Farms will also ship it to your door.

I have drunk both raw and pasteurized camel milk from Desert Farms. It tastes to me essentially the same as 2 percent milk from cows, which has a similar fat content. Camel milk, whether raw or pasteurized, has 4.5 grams of total fat per 8 ounces, while 2 percent cow’s milk has 5 grams in the same serving size.

Camels are rare in the United States, which is the main reason why camel milk is considerably more expensive than cow’s milk. There are 18,000 cows for every camel in the United States, the Desert Farms website says.

We have only 3,000 to 5,000 camels here, according to two different estimates. And many of them work in circuses or live in zoos. Almost one-third of the estimated 19,000,000 camels in the world live in Somalia, where camel milk is readily available, along with Sudan, Kenya, India, and Saudi Arabia. When the U.S. Agency for International Development sent me to Somalia in 1963, I didn’t drink any camel milk, although I saw thousands of camels herded by Somali nomads and brought back an authentic pair of wooden camel bells.


Between Hargeisa and Arabsyio, Somalia, December 1963

The founder of Desert Farms, Walid Abdul-Wahab, came to this country from his native Saudi Arabia. But most of the camel ranchers he works with are Amish and Mennonite people in the Midwest.

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A Diet for Managing the Most Common Condition of Diabetes

October 7th, 2014 · No Comments

Almost all of us who have diabetes have to deal with other medical problems too. But none of these conditions affects more of us than obesity and the problems that come with it.

More than 85 percent of adults with diabetes were overweight in the U.S. government’s Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. And 54.8 percent of the adults with diabetes were obese.

That’s why a study that a journal of the American College of Physicians will publish tomorrow is so important to us even though it specifically excluded people with diabetes. The study also excluded anyone who had heart or kidney disease, but it did include 119 men and women with a body mass index of 30 to 45.

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Are These 3 Ice Creams Diabetes-Friendly to You?

October 6th, 2014 · No Comments

With the heat of summer the body often yearns for the cooling sensation of ice cream. This year for the first time since I learned two decades ago that I have diabetes I succumbed to the temptation.

But until now I have refrained from writing about ice cream so as not to lead anyone too far down the slippery slope of gluttony, also known as pigging out. Few of us can limit our indulgence to 1/2 cup or less in a sitting. I can’t.

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